Scout and walter cunningham relationship

Scout's Relationships by nicole sampson on Prezi

scout and walter cunningham relationship

When Scout criticizes Walter Cunningham's eating habits, Calpurnia scolds Scout, smacks her .. They might guess that the relationship between the children. Scout's relationship with Atticus. "found our Scout tells Miss Caroline this about Walter Cunningham and his family Why Scout beats up Walter Cunningham. Investigating the relations between gender, race and classism in Maycomb Yet after Scout beats Walter Cunningham up Jem invites him to have lunch at.

Discuss the concept of education. Does Lee argue for a dominance of education in the home or institutionalized education? What evidence does she provide? Trace the theme of the mockingbird throughout the novel and analyze what the bird symbolizes or represents. Trace Boo Radley's development. How does his character evolve?

How does Scout's understanding of Boo develop? What lessons does Boo teach Scout? Discuss Atticus's approach to parenting. What is his relationship with his children? Can his parenting style be criticized? Scout and Jem mature considerably through the course of the novel. What developmental changes do they go through, and what causes these changes?

scout and walter cunningham relationship

Discuss the town of Maycomb as you might discuss a main character in the book. What is the identity or "character" of the town, and how if at all does it change and grow over the years? How does its diversity give it a pluralistic character?

Discuss law as it is represented in To Kill A Mockinbird. During her testimony she is confused by Atticus' polite speech and thinks that his use of "Miss Mayella" is meant to mock her. She testifies against Tom Robinson.

Analyze the relationship between Boo Radley and the children. How

Mayella is played by Collin Wilcox in the film. Atticus is assigned to defend him, and stands up to a lynch mob intent on exacting their own justice against him before the trial begins.

Tom's left arm is crippled and useless, the result of an accident with a cotton gin when he was a child. Atticus uses this fact as the cornerstone of his defense strategy, pointing out that the nature of Mayella's facial injuries strongly suggest a left-handed assailant. Tom testifies that he had frequently helped Mayella with household chores because he felt sorry for her and the family's difficult life - a statement that shocks the all-white, male jury.

Despite Atticus' skilled defense, the jury's racial prejudices lead them to find Tom guilty. Atticus plans to appeal the verdict, but before he can do so, Tom is shot and killed while trying to escape the prison where he is being held. Tom Robinson is played by Brock Peters. She has a son named Henry and a very spoiled grandson named Francis.

Around the middle of the book, Aunt Alexandra decides to leave her husband at Finch's Landing, the Finch family homestead to come stay with the Finches. Aunt Alexandra doesn't consider the black Calpurnia to be a very good motherly figure for Jem and Scout; she disapproves of Scout being a tomboy and wants to make Scout into a southern belle encouraging her to act more 'lady like'. However, as the trial progresses, Scout comes to see how much her aunt cares for her father and what a strong woman she is.

This is especially evidenced by a tea party when Scout is horrified by the racism displayed, and her aunt and Miss Maudie help her deal with her feelings. By the end of the book, it's clear that Alexandra cares very much for her niece and nephew, though she and Scout will probably never really get along.

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He is about 40, which is 10 years younger than Atticus. Jack smells like alcohol and something sweet, and is said that he and Alexandra have similar features. Jack is a childless doctor who can always make Scout and Jem laugh, and they adore him. He and Miss Maudie are close to the same age; he frequently teases her with marriage proposals, which she always declines.

Jack also has a pet cat named Rose Aylmer, who is mentioned during the Christmas visit. The son of her son, Henry Hancock. Francis lives in Mobile, Alabamaand is a bit of a tattle-tale.

He gets along well with Jem, but often spars with Scout. One Christmas, Francis calls Atticus a "nigger-lover," as well as insisting that he was ruining the family and the likes, which infuriates Scout and causes them to get into a fight. Francis lies about his role in it, telling Uncle Jack that Scout started it by calling him a "whore lady", and Jack therefore punishes Scout.

However, she explains the full story and charitably persuades her uncle not to punish Francis about it, but to let Atticus think they had been fighting about something else although Atticus later discovers the truth.

Henry Lafayette Dubose[ edit ] Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose is an elderly woman who lives near the Finches. She is hated by the children, who run by her house to avoid her.

Dubose as "plain hell. As a punishment, Jem is required to read to Mrs. Dubose each day for a month. As Jem reads, she experiences a fit of drooling and twitching and does not seem to pay any attention to the words.

When an alarm rings, Jem is allowed to leave for the day. She extends the punishment for one extra week and dies shortly after letting Jem go for the last time. Atticus informs him that Mrs. Dubose was terminally ill and had become addicted to morphine. By reading to her, Jem had distracted her so that she could break the addiction. In thanks, she leaves him a candy box with a camellia flower in it; Jem burns the box in anger, but is later seen by Scout admiring the flower.

Atticus tells Jem that Mrs. Dubose was the bravest person he ever knew, and she was trying to teach Jem the importance of bravery and true courage to endure anything when the situation is hopeless, as in her morphine addiction. Heck Tate[ edit ] Mr. Heck Tate is a friend of Atticus and also the sheriff of Maycomb County.

He believes in protecting the innocent although he doesn't usually show it.

Scout's Relationships by nicole sampson on Prezi

At the end of the book, the Atticus and Heck argue over whether Jem or Boo Radley should be held responsible for the death of Bob Ewell. Heck eventually persuades Atticus to accept the theory that Ewell accidentally fell on his own knife, thus saving the harmless, reclusive Boo from the public exposure of a criminal trial.

Braxton Underwood[ edit ] Mr. Braxton Bragg Underwood is a news reporter and a friend of Atticus. He owns and also publishes The Maycomb Tribune. Being a racist, he disagrees with Atticus on principle.

He also has a strong belief in justice, as exemplified when he defends Atticus from the Cunningham mob by having his double barrel shotgun loaded and ready to shoot them.

He also demonstrates some humanity when he publishes a scathing editorial comparing the killing of Tom Robinson a cripple to "the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children". Horace Gilmer[ edit ] Mr. Horace Gilmer is a lawyer from Abbottsville, and is the prosecuting attorney in the Tom Robinson case. Gilmer is between the ages of forty and sixty. Gilmer has a slight cast with one eye, which he uses to his advantage in trial.

Gilmer appeared to be racist in his harsh cross-examination of Tom Robinson, but it is hinted at that he is in fact going easy on Tom. He and Atticus are not rivals and talk to each other during recesses during the case.

Essay: To Kill A Mockingbird

Reynolds[ edit ] Dr. Reynolds is the Maycomb doctor. He is well known to Scout and Jem. Scout says that he "had brought Jem and me into the world, had led us through every childhood disease known to man including the time Jem fell out of the tree house, and he had never lost our friendship.

Reynolds said that if we were boil-prone things would have been different He inspects Jem's broken arm and Scout's minor bruises after the attack from Bob Ewell under the tree. Dolphus Raymond[ edit ] Dolphus Raymond is a white landowner who is jaded by the hypocrisy of the white society and prefers to live among black folks.

In fact, he has children with a black woman. Dolphus pretends he is an alcoholic so that the people of Maycomb will have an excuse for his behavior, but in fact he only drinks Coca Cola out of a paper bag to try to hide it. When Dill and Scout discover that he is not a drunk, they are amazed.

He shows Scout how sometimes you can pretend to be someone you're not so people will be more understanding of you. Link Deas[ edit ] Link Deas owns cotton fields and a store in Maycomb who employs Tom and later Helen because she does not get accepted by any other employers in the county due to Tom Robinson's legal troubles.

He announces to the court in defense of Tom at one point in the trial that he hadn't "had a speck o' trouble outta him" in the eight years Tom had been working for him, and gets sent out by Judge John Taylor for doing so.

When Bob Ewell starts threatening Helen after the trial, Mr. Deas fiercely defends her and threatens to have Mr. Ewell arrested if he keeps bothering her. He is on Tom Robinson's side during the trial and remains loyal to the family afterward. She attempts to teach the first grade class using a new system which she learned from taking certain college courses Jem mistakenly refers to it as the " Dewey Decimal System ", which is really how library books are organized.

She is upset by Scout's advanced reading capabilities and believes that Scout is receiving lessons from Atticus. She feels as though Scout is trying to outsmart and mock her. In an effort to standardize the class, she forbids Scout from reading with her father.

Atticus asks Scout to step into Miss Caroline's skin.

scout and walter cunningham relationship

However, he continues to allow Scout to read with him at night so long as she continues to go to school. Miss Caroline has good intentions but proves quite incompetent as a teacher. She is also very sensitive and gets emotionally hurt quite easily, as seen when she cries after Burris Ewell yells at her, "Report and be damned to ye!

Ain't no snot-nosed slut of a schoolteacher ever born c'n make me do nothin'! You ain't makin' me go nowhere, missus. You just remember that, you ain't makin' me go nowhere!

African Church in Maycomb County, where most if not all of the African-American characters go to church. Reverend Sykes forces the congregation to donate 10 dollars for Tom Robinson's family since at the time, Tom's wife, Helen, was having trouble finding work.

During the trial, when the courtroom was too packed for the children to find seats, Reverend Sykes lets the kids sit with him up in the colored balcony and even saves their seats for them. Miss Stephanie Crawford[ edit ] Stephanie Crawford is the neighborhood gossip who claimed that she saw Boo Radley from her bedroom standing outside of her cleaned window one night.

Crawford is one of the first on the scene after a loud gunshot is heard behind the Radley house. Because she is the neighborhood gossip, it is unwise to think of anything that she says as true, because most of the time it is not true at all. She is a friend of Alexandra Hancock. She is thrilled to pass on gossip to the kids about Boo Radley. She claimed to have witnessed Bob Ewell's threatening Atticus at the Post Office corner as she was returning from the local Jitney Jungle grocery store.

In the film, she takes the place of Rachel Haverford and is now Dill's aunt. She drank neat whiskey heavily after seeing a rattlesnake coiled in her closet, on her washing, when she hung her negligee up. Even though she can be very hard to deal with, she truly does love her nephew. Her family name, in the legends of Maycomb County, is synonymous with jackass. She is also a Southern Belle. In the film, she is not a character and Miss Stephanie takes her place as Dill's aunt. She is spoken about a few times.

She has three children. Employed by Link Deas following the death of her husband, she is repeatedly harassed by Bob Ewell when traveling to work.

Upon learning of this, Deas threatens Ewell, forcing him to stop. She is an example of how one person's actions can have an effect on a lot of people and she elucidates the hardships that surround the Tom Robinson case. When the children try to catch a view of "Boo" late one night through a window, he shoots over their heads with a shotgun albeit thinking he was aiming at a black person. Nathan also cements up the knothole in which Arthur leaves little gifts for the children.

On the other hand, he helps Miss Maudie by saving some of her belongings when her house is on fire. He is more present than his brother, but equally mysterious. Jessie[ edit ] Jessie is Mrs. She is the woman who shoos the children out when Mrs. Dubose has her fits, and she seems to care enormously for Mrs. When Jem is forced to stay reading to Mrs.

Dubose, Jessie kindly leads Jem and Scout to the door when Mrs. Dubose's alarm goes off. The rumors about Mrs. Dubose concealing a gun about her person involves Jessie; the book says "and even if Mrs. Dubose missed, her girl Jessie wouldn't". Burris Ewell[ edit ] Burris Ewell is a son of Bob Ewell and a younger sibling of Mayella Ewell as well as the first antagonist of the novel.

scout and walter cunningham relationship

He comes to the first day of school, but departs just as everyone else in his family does. Burris is also poor. He has live lice in his hair. Burris also scared his teacher Caroline Fisher. He behaves rudely when she tells him to go home, wash his hair, and come back clean the next day. He refuses, and a student explains to Miss Caroline that Ewell children don't attend school.

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All they do is show up for the first day, get marked down on the register, and then they miss the entire school year until the first day of the next year. His famous quote was, "Report and be damned to ye! Burris is also like his father and is very belligerent. Lula[ edit ] Lula is an African-American woman with a dislike for white people.

She doesn't like the idea of Calpurnia bringing Atticus Finch's children, Jem and Scout, with her to church and tells her so but is overruled by the other congregants. According to James Zeebo, Calpurnia's son, Lula's said to be, "a troublemaker from way back, with fancy ideas and haughty ways. Grace Merriweather[ edit ] Mrs. Grace Merriweather is the producer of the play in which Scout plays as a ham.

He lives on a farm. He is too poor to even pay off a cent debt because the Great Depression hit his poor family hard. He doesn't take money because his family can't pay people back in cash. His father paid Atticus for his service for something a while back with some goods. Walter is invited over to the Finches' house once, after engaging in a fight with Scout, where he covers up all of his dinner with molasses, much to Scout's vocal dismay.

This teaches Scout a lesson in humility and compassion. He appears only twice, once at the beginning of the story when he has to pay off the debt to Atticus Walter Cunningham Sr. He also leads the mob that comes to lynch Tom Robinson the night before the trial. Only when Scout talks to him about his son and how much he owes to Atticus does he reconsider and call off the mob.

Scout innocently shames him because Scout reminds him of all the things that Atticus has done for him and for Maycomb County. After the verdict is given in the trial, Atticus tells Jem that one of the Cunninghams had changed his thoughts about Tom and pleaded that Tom was not guilty to the jury. Little Chuck Little[ edit ] Little Chuck Little is a student in Scout's first-grade class who has the mindset of an adult.

scout and walter cunningham relationship

His real name is Charles. He is depicted as chiefly antagonistic of Burris Ewell. He is presented in the novel when Miss Caroline is frightened by Burris' lice. He warned Miss Caroline that if Burris wasn't released from class, he might try something that would put their classmates at risk. I'd soon's kill you as look at you.